David’s Wives – Hearts Devoted to a King

Standard

As I read the narratives for this week, I found that as I dug, I sometimes encountered nice artifacts – a piece of pottery, some coins, maybe even a nice statue. But as I continued to dig, I felt like all I found were BONES. Sometimes you get nice artifacts, and sometimes you find the skeletons in the closet.

David was the “man after God’s own heart” but he was still just a man. He had a few skeletons in his closet, and unfortunately for him, they became public knowledge. After all, his story is in the most read book of all times!

We’ve set the stage for the period of the kings, having heard of Hannah’s son, Samuel, who was the prophet and judge to appoint Israel’s first king, Saul. There is a sense of anticipation and hope as the people of Israel look to their leader.

But leaders sometimes fall short, because as good or morally upright as they are, they are still human and make for poor gods.

Even as Saul was on the decline, God was raising up David, the man after His own heart, whom He would make the most impressive covenant with yet!

Within David’s story are SEVERAL (talk about an understatement) important narratives, each with their own teaching points. God’s Word is alive and active, and through the Spirit, God teaches us countless lessons from the life of David and his wives.

So what’s the big picture? How can we see the beauty of the forest and not get hung up on a low hanging limb?

For today we’re going to focus on the condition of these women’s hearts (if we can even know that) and also God’s promise and presence.

“God’s Presence Turned Away”

David didn’t start out as a king, no, he was a lowly shepherd who served under King Saul.

Over and over we read that God was with David and made him prosper in whatever he did. It was this favor from God that caused Saul to fear David the most. And it was this fear that drove Saul to madness, resulting in his pursuit of David’s life.

Here’s how it all began:

Saul had turned his eyes from the Lord and began to fear man and not God.

After disobeying God in his treatment of king Agag the Amalekite, Samuel confronts him and Saul says this in 1 Sam 15:24-28:

24 “I have sinned, for I have transgressed the commandment of the Lord and your words, because I feared the people and obeyed their voice25 Now therefore, please pardon my sin and return with me that I may bow before the Lord.” 26 And Samuel said to Saul, “I will not return with you. For you have rejected the word of the Lord, and the Lord has rejected you from being king over Israel.”27 As Samuel turned to go away, Saul seized the skirt of his robe, and it tore. 28 And Samuel said to him, “The Lord has torn the kingdom of Israel from you this day and has given it to a neighbor of yours, who is better than you.”

“God’s Presence in David’s Life”

So even before we meet David’s wives, David has been chosen by God to be king of Israel. 1 Samuel 16:12b-13 says:

And the Lord said, “Arise, anoint him, for this is he.”13 Then Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the midst of his brothers. And the Spirit of the Lord rushed upon David from that day forward.

You probably noticed as you read the text this week and in previous weeks that although God chooses a “king” for His people, He is still their King. The human king was to “serve as [God’s] viceroy. Yahweh was the real King, while the human king was his representative or regent, chosen by God to carry out His earthly tasks.” (Arnold, 461)

Saul was rejected by God because He had rejected the Word of God. He had been chosen to carry out God’s tasks, but he disobeyed. God chose a new king who would be obedient.

And David enters into service to Saul, fully knowing that he is the Lord’s anointed, yet still respecting Saul as king whom he often referred to as “God’s anointed”. He is contrasted with Saul who has no more Spirit of God with him but rather has an evil spirit who torments him from time to time.

What happens next is the showdown with Goliath, a major indication that God is with David, (1 Sam 17) and all of Israel goes crazy over this young David! All except Saul, that is. He goes crazy jealous over young David.

It was at this point that Saul, having had the Lord’s presence removed from him, begins to seek ways to kill David.

His first plan involved killing him with a spear. But that plan failed so he moved to Plan B: His daughters.

Adoring Michal

1 Samuel 18:20-21 is where we first meet Michal, Saul’s daughter. Pronounced “Me-kawl” (spelled Miykal). Her name meant “who is like God”.

 Now Saul’s daughter Michal loved David. And they told Saul, and the thing pleased him. 21 Saul thought, “Let me give her to him, that she may be a snare for him and that the hand of the Philistines may be against him.” Therefore Saul said to David a second time, “You shall now be my son-in-law.”

This is the second time Saul had offered one of his daughters, but David, being the humble man he was, did not believe he was suitable to be the son-in-law to a king since he was a lowly shepherd from an insignificant family. (v. 18) A poor man with no reputation (v. 23).

He was trying to say, I can’t afford the bride price for a daughter of the king. I’m also not worthy to be called the son-in-law to the king.

But Saul’s Plan B backfires on him! Because not only was the LORD with David, but also Michal, his daughter, loved David (v. 28).

Have you ever been there before? In love? A heart blushing (or bursting) with love for someone? She had a very red heart – a heart devoted to young David.

He connects her being a “snare” with “the hand of the Philistines” being against him. Saul has in mind that the bride price he sets for his daughter’s hand in marriage will result in David’s demise. Verse 25 says that Saul hoped that David would “fall by the hand of the Philistines.”

Was Saul using his daughter as a trap/snare to kill her beloved David? You bet he was! Imagine his surprise when David drops a bag of 200 Philistine foreskins at his feet! Double the price that was requested. 200 more enemies dead at David’s hands. All for his daughter. All to be Saul’s son-in-law.

Oh and by the way, Saul’s son, Jonathan, loved David too (18:1, 19:1). God loved him. Israel loved him. Judah loved him. Michal loved him. Saul was NOT feeling the love.

And perhaps David was not feeling the love for Michal either for in verse 26 it says,

26 And when his servants told David these words, it pleased David well to be the king’s son-in-law.

There is no mention of him being pleased to be “her husband.”

Have you ever been there before? A love not reciprocated? A heart broken? Michal’s heart is starting to look a bit broken.

As the narrative progresses, David continues to have more successes in battle against the Philistines (because of God) which meant Saul continued to try harder and harder to kill David. The text indicates that v. 23 David went from being lightly esteemed to v. 30 being highly esteemed.

But Michal stood in Saul’s way. Adoring Michal saved David’s life.

As much as she loved him, do you think she knew that David might not love her as she loved him? That she may not see him for a very long time since he father was chasing her beloved David?

She lies to save him. He’s sick. Sorry, come back later.

Finally daddy comes in and she lies again. He threatened me with my life!

Like Rahab, she lies to save someone’s life!

It makes me wonder what was at stake for her. Could her father, the king, have put her to death? Saul accuses his daughter of conspiring against him by letting his enemy go (v. 17).

Excuse me, Saul, but David is her husband AND your son-in-law! He’s not your enemy. Don’t put your daughter into such a precarious situation. You’re crazy, Saul!

This part of the narrative serves to express the impossibility of Saul’s attempts to keep David from the throne which God Himself has promised for him. God had also told Saul that He would no longer be with him, and even though Saul would desperately grasp and clamor to hold his power, his efforts would be fruitless. God’s plans always prevail.

After this the text goes silent about Michal until you read the last verse of the Abigail narrative in 1 Samuel 25.

Liz Curtis Higgs in her book Bad Girls of the Bible believed that 14 years passed between the time David escaped and when he saw her again.

1 Sam 21:10-15 says David even sought refuge among his enemy, the Philistine lord at Gath! And then in 22:3-4 with the king of Moab. And he continues to evade Saul’s grasp, even coming so close to cut a corner off of his robe.

The text does not indicate the time frame of David’s exile, but you get the impression that God’s protection is over him and that he learns to trust God during this time. After all, God had made a promise, and He never breaks a promise! So no matter how life-threatening the circumstance was, God would ensure his safety.

Poor adoring Michal. She’s pining away for her beloved David. It sounds like she was with her father, so you have to wonder what influence he had over her heart. Did his “crazy” take root in her heart? Did she believe her father’s lies about David? How’s that heart looking about now?

 

{Stay tuned for Part 2 about Wise Abigail}

Advertisements

2 responses »

  1. Wow, so Informative. I’ve never really paid much attention to Michal’s story. You’ve inspired me to go read all about it. Now I’m ready for part 2. LOL

    • And there’s so much I couldn’t put in there because I had NO TIME! I was so so sad! The text for Michal is 1 Samuel 18:17-29, 19:11-17, 25:44 & 2 Samuel 6:1-5, 14-23. I’m so glad you read my post! Thank you for commenting!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s